Sublimated clocks

Try This: How to Sublimate Colorful Clocks

Josh Bender serves as a sublimation specialist for Unisub. In his role, Bender sublimates and sends out samples to trade shows, customers, and potential clients. As an industry expert, he attends trade shows and answers customers' technical sublimation questions.

Shira Allego has worked for Unisub for nine years, serving as a sublimation specialist for four years. In her role, Allego sublimates and sends out samples to trade shows, customers, and potential clients. As an industry expert, she attends trade shows and answers customers' technical sublimation questions.

Sublimated clocks are perfect for any room—from the mantle to the wall, they’re sure to make an impression.

Follow a few simple steps to sublimate clocks in no time.

Materials Needed

  • Sublimatable clock
  • Clockwork kit with Phillips screwdriver (optional); these kits are available via Unisub and require some assembly.
  • Blowout paper
  • Microfiber cloth and all-purpose cleaner
  • Heat tape

Step One: Preparation

Peel the film from the clock face and clean its surface with all-purpose cleaner and microfiber cloth. (Image 1)

Line up and center the clock to the transfer. For offset clocks or mahogany vertical mantel clocks, tape the transfer for the back. For all other clocks, tape flat to the transfer paper. (Image 2)

Step Two: Sublimation

With the bare sides facing up, press aluminum clocks at 400 F for 1:15-1:25 minutes. For all other materials, press the clock at 1.5 minutes. Time may vary based on equipment. Remove the transfer and allow the product to cool.

Step Three: Assembly (Optional)

To assemble the clockwork and mount the finished product, first insert the movement through the hole in the clock face, then slide the brass washer over the shaft. Attach the dial mounting hex nut and gently press the hour hand onto the shaft at the 12:00 position. Gently screw the minute nut in place if the second hand will be used. Press the second hand at 12:00 position. Screw on the cap nut if no second hand is used. (Image 3)