Show, Don’t Tell: 10 tips for an effective showroom layout

Eric Priceman is President of Victory. In his almost three decades in the awards and engraving industry, he has traveled extensively, both domestically and internationally, visiting customers and suppliers. He is happy to share his unique perspectives of the industry, both past and present. Please feel free to contact Eric by email at ericp@buyvictory.com or by phone at 773-637-7777 ext. 228.

Proper setup includes a full dissection of your business to determine the types of products sold in relation to the types of customers that the business attracts. In order to effectively parallel what you intend to sell with what you show, consider these 10 tips:

  1. An important measure of a retail store’s success is sales dollars per square foot. Maximizing this will directly impact the bottom line positively.
  2. All items that you have on the shelves and walls need to have a justification as to why they exist in the space that they do.
  3. Make sure that the percentages hold. If you project that 20 percent of your overall sales will be trophies and 80 percent will be corporate, your showroom offerings should parallel these numbers.
  4. A smart display of trophies should include multiple sizes, styles and colors and include examples of completed trophies in different events.
  5. The faster you can demonstrate to a customer that you have a solution for them, the better chance that you will close an order. It shows a customer that you know your business inside and out, and therefore there is no reason to shop anywhere else.
  6. Use one or more flat panel displays to enhance the experience for a customer.
  7. Make sure the products in your showroom are relevant to the needs of your core customers and don’t take up valuable space for items that sell sparsely or not at all.
  8. Make sure you have a basic handle on what the lead times will be if a customer needs to place an order for items that you do not readily have in stock.
  9. You may choose to have an area for discontinued items, or items that were bought from a supplier as a “special.”
  10. You never want to get a customer excited about closeouts in place of regular items.

—Eric Priceman, Victory