stamp uv light Shachihata Inc stamps unwanted behavior public personal protection

Shachihata Develops Stamps to Deter Unwanted Behavior

Julia Schroeder is digital content editor of Awards & Engraving magazine.

When you think of stamps, you might think of personalized signatures with rubber stamps and notary marking devices. With the times changing and people taking a stand for personal space across the globe, stamps might be something with even more uses than originally thought.  

Shachihata Inc., the maker of Xstamper, and a manufacturer of stamps, marking devices, and stamp pads, recently developed a new stamp designed to deter unwanted behavior on public transportation and at other public events. The device is a cap-less 9mm rubber stamp with a yellow body to signify caution. Displaying the stamp in plain view is expected to deter unwanted behavior, according to Shachihata. 

The stamp leaves an impression of a palm of a hand to signify stop. It uses invisible ink and in case the stamp mark needs to be viewed, a UV light is also provided with the stamp. Shachihata says the stamp is easy to operate with one hand and comes with a locking cap and retractable cord to attach to a handbag or pocket to be easily identified. The color yellow was chosen as it represents “caution” and stands out; a special UV ink was adapted, and the retractable line and UV light were then added to complete the stamp kit as a test model.

The test models were offered as part of a test-run of 500 stamps in Japan on August 27, 2019, which sold out in less than 30 minutes. Since the release of the test-run, the stamp went viral on social media and has been featured on a variety of major and local news broadcasts. However, according to Shachihata, the media altered the product as an “Anti-Groping” stamp, rather than a stamp to deter unwanted behavior in Japan.

Shachihata told A&E that this product was developed in response to numerous opinions and requests on social media in May of 2019 about how to discourage unwanted behavior on crowded trains. As stated by the company, in Japan there is an “Anti-Nuisance Ordinance” and Shachihata hopes this stamp will reduce the number of violations of this ordinance. 

“The idea of the stamp originated from group discussions on social media,” Shachihata explains. “Many suggestions came up during this discussion and the one idea that stood out was some sort of stamp that could be used to deter unwanted behavior.”

The company adds that whether use of the stamp in any situation is warranted is a decision that must be made in judgement of each purchaser and Shachihata Inc. is not responsible for identifying or proving guilt of an assailant. 

For more information, visit www.xstamper.net.